6.23.2012

survey says:

"More shade".

It gets hot here in the summer. In order to minimise exposure to the sun while running trains in the garden, I've settled on the 'more shade' versus 'less wet' option for the location of the track. Time will tell if this decision is a good one; I may need to invest in some Wellingtons.

I'll use a couple of garden hoses to establish the (very simple) arrangment of track. I'd like to minimise the impact on mowing and trimming the grass-like substances that cover the ground, so I'll have to leave room for the passage of a garden tractor at the periphery.

In terms of route, it will be a simple oval with a siding offering a spot for guests to 'steam-up'. 32mm gauge, single track. Still looking for an inexpensive method of raising the track off the ground; galvanised steel fence posts are the current front-runner for the job.

Going to visit another garden railroader who is using raised track this week. I vaguely recall his solution being practical and effective. More investigation is warranted, but I can (at least) lay out the route with wooden stakes and see how it looks.

hazy crazy lazy...

...days of Summer. At least the first two terms are accurate. Lazy, I'm not so sure of.

Too many activities to jam into the space between a wet Spring and a cool Autumn. Despite longer daylight hours, the highly desirable hobby pursuits - trains, machining, woodworking - seem to get pushed off to the side far too easily.

This isn't to say that overall gains are not being made. Things are getting done; far more of the 'must-do' versus several fewer of the 'nice-to-haves'; and these all build towards the grail-like end goal we have each set for ourselves.

The process of making things 'a little better tomorrow than they are today' continues unabated. It is important to look at achievement and progress in terms of trends, otherwise even a small setback or delay will take on a weight disproportionate to its long term impact.

Once a few items that are beyond personal control settle themselves, and a couple of self-serving tasks are brought to a conclusion, there will be more leisure and less lament.